Boycott the 2012 Election!

In case you missed it, the Prole Center has endorsed the growing Boycott the 2012 Presidential Election movement. Encourage everyone you know to boycott the vote, but most importantly, try to persuade and put pressure on any political or civic organization you are a member of to publicly endorse a boycott of the upcoming elections.

Now, to boycott the election is not an apathetic gesture. You need to let those around you, especially members of the establishment, know that you have made a conscious choice to abstain from voting because you know that the political system is entirely corrupt, rigged – even ridiculous. You’re not going to be bamboozled. You’re not going to give the bastards the satisfaction of laughing behind your back. You know that we live in a dictatorship – not even very cleverly disguised if you just open your eyes and pay attention. To show your displeasure and rejection of the system, we suggest you consider one possibility (there are many others): Participate in a public demonstration where all participants agree to burn their voter registration/ID cards. Let’s put out the word that we’re not going to be complicit in our own exploitation or the murderous schemes of imperialism!!

The Boycotter’s Manifesto

Whereas both major political parties have sold out to the Wall Street banks and multinational corporations with no allegiance to the Nation or the people,

Whereas third parties have no possibility of winning the Presidential election due to corporate control over the electoral process and the media,

Whereas three decades of solid efforts to reform the electoral process have been subverted by the corporate state,

Whereas participation in the electoral process lends legitimacy to a system that has lost its legitimacy,

We hereby refuse to vote in the 2012 Presidential election.

About Prole Center

Inspiring class-consciousness and an educated, strong and militant Working Class
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9 Responses to Boycott the 2012 Election!

  1. terrilee says:

    Thank you for your support Prole Center!

  2. Pingback: Boycott the 2012 Presidential Election » Proletarian Center for Research, Education and Culture has officially endorsed the Call to Boycott the 2012 Presidential Election

  3. terrilee says:

    Kindly note that the Call to Boycott the Presidential Election now shares reciprocal web linking with the Prole Center! Check it out at http://www.electionboycott2012.org

  4. Sam Holloway says:

    I would like to analyze this post.

    You need to let those around you, especially members of the establishment, know that you have made a conscious choice to abstain from voting because you know that the political system is entirely corrupt, rigged – even ridiculous.

    “Members of the establishment,” unless they are suffering from a mental break, are fully aware that “the political system is entirely corrupt, rigged– even ridiculous.” How is electoral abstinence intended to affect them? Furthermore, if the purpose is to call attention to the system’s lack of viability, then what is the next step? Is there an alternative system being proposed? If not, then to what is the boycott supposed to lead?

    You know that we live in a dictatorship – not even very cleverly disguised if you just open your eyes and pay attention.

    If this is true, then isn’t an organized effort to call attention to this fact inherently redundant?

    Let’s put out the word that we’re not going to be complicit in our own exploitation or the murderous schemes of imperialism!!

    So this boycott will be accompanied by a tax boycott as well? Will it be accompanied by a call for nationwide mutiny by the armed forces and by law enforcement? The electoral abstinence of x number of citizens will have zero effect on domestic or foreign exploitation, at least while the revenue streams still exist and the exploitation has enough willing agents.

    Whereas third parties have no possibility of winning the Presidential election due to corporate control over the electoral process and the media…

    This is factually untrue, inasmuch as it confuses possibility with probability. Jill Stein, for example, is on the ballot in more than enough states to capture sufficient electoral votes. If she fails to win the White House, it will be because an insufficient number of voters selected her, not because she ‘didn’t have a chance.’ In effect, the problem here is not the system, or even the wealthy interests that have abused the system; the problem is the voters. (The same can be said at the congressional and local levels, where Green candidates who do the hard work of getting on ballots are almost completely ignored.)

    I would be willing to accept as sound the assertion that the U.S.A. has become too large, too populated, and too unwieldy to govern under the system set forth in the Constitution. If the system itself lacks legitimacy, then it is largely because the system can’t function (to its professed intent) on such a scale, and can only be perpetuated as a thinly veiled sham. The Boycott Manifesto implies awareness of this perspective, but it falls short for lack of a key element: relevant action.

    Can legitimacy be restored to the system? If not, then with what shall the system be replaced? A verbal disavowal of the system, accompanied by physical electoral abstinence, may offer ephemeral moral satisfaction, but then what? The system roars right along unchallenged, because, as the language of the manifesto clearly illustrates, the voices of the voters (participating or not) are irrelevant.

    An electoral boycott, unless accompanied by some other concrete action, is by its very nature an exercise in irony. Attach to the manifesto advocacy for something constructive– dissolution of the union in favor of several smaller, more manageable republics, for example– and it gains meaning.

    • Rex says:

      Hi Sam,

      I think you make some very good points. We definitely have to think now about the steps that we would take after a boycott. I would suggest that possible future steps could involve, in addition to the ongoing mass demonstrations (e.g., Occupy/Decolonize, anti-war, for single payer health care, for student debt forgiveness, etc) happening throughout all the cities of the U.S., also organizing a people’s registration, and eventually a people’s election. A people’s election would be transparent and organized in such a way that no rigging could occur. This would attract masses of voters that have been disillusioned with the corrupt electoral circus, and also disenfranchised voters that should most definitely be allowed to vote.

      Your suggestion of breaking into smaller states, I would say bioregions, would be a very good move too. As you may know, here in the North West there is a growing movement for a free Cascadia bioregion. Other bioregions could start their own movements.

      I think we also need to emphasize that elections are most probably rigged, especially in swing states, and because of this lack of election integrity, 3rd party candidates may not win even if we all voted for them. Now, if the elections were not rigged, then you would make a valid point. So there’s some faith involved. Rigged or not rigged or a better question, how rigged?

      Thanks for your valuable input,

      Rex

      • Prole Center says:

        A people’s election sounds like a wonderful idea. However, before this can happen, I think all Left political parties, unions, community organizations, etc., should join together in one, large, federated, “Popular Front.” We need one large organization working explicitly in the interests of the working class. We need unity around a common goal!

      • Sam Holloway says:

        Hello, Rex. Thanks for the reply. I believe you raise some very important issues here. First I’d like to address the point about rigged elections. I don’t dismiss this issue, but I do believe it’s largely redundant. It’s difficult to quantify on such a large scale, but anecdotal evidence suggests that the elections are rigged in the minds of the electorate before the technology has a chance to get involved. This leads into another issue you touch, which is the Occupy movement. As I understand it, the Occupy movement has more or less eschewed and rejected involvement in electoral politics, at least as a primary goal. In concert with the spirit and ideals of the election boycott, I believe this is necessary and constructive. However, I believe that mass action outside of corrupted conventional political channels needs to move away from protest and move into networking and forming alternative community structures within our existing ones. If I understand the Occupy movement correctly, that’s more or less already been happening.

        It remains to be seen if this dynamic can be adapted and spread to more people. This is why I consider the election boycott to be redundant on its own; there are so many people disillusioned with the process already. If they can’t be roused to support or offer better electoral alternatives within the existing system (i.e. Green, Socialist, or other candidates), then can they be encouraged to participate in alternative and concurrent forms of self-government?

        This is more than just a theoretical question; if the system is hopelessly corrupt, then it is going to collapse. (Indeed, some argue persuasively that the collapse is already well under way.) We all need to consider how we are going to coexist during and after the worst of that collapse. I am not a libertarian or an anarchist, nor do I presume to speak for anyone who hews to those philosophical lines, but as an African-American living in a well-armed, violent, selfish, and deeply racist society, I am understandably concerned about the consequences of societal collapse. If we aren’t going to double our efforts to rescue and refurbish the existing system, then we need to be serious and proactive about replacing it with something better than our worst nightmares.

    • Prole Center says:

      Thanks for your thoughtful comments. Yes, unfortunately there is no magic bullet. An election boycott alone is not going to accomplish all that much. It is just one tactic, among many, that helps build what Glen Ford of Black Agenda Report calls a “culture of resistance.” We think an election boycott is the right thing to do at this point, and for the foreseeable future. If you’re willing to keep an open mind and entertain the possibility, you can get more information here: http://www.electionboycott2012.org/

  5. Pingback: My thoughts on a proposed boycott of the 2012 election « Church of the Bad News

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