Let Your Life Be a Friction to Stop the Machine

An interesting, mostly truthful and informative short film, but I have a few comments to make about it:

Regarding the images of Stalin and Mao that pop up in connection with the Lord Acton quote about the corrupting influence of power, I say you can’t have it both ways. If the Soviet Union was the only force powerful enough to hold the capitalists at bay (as is mentioned in the film), then you shouldn’t demonize Stalin whose leadership made the USSR into a superpower. That’s not to say that Stalin was perfect, of course.

Also, I don’t believe the Lord Acton quote that power always corrupts. It depends on what you do with the power; and I find it amusing that a fucking aristocrat’s remarks about power are so widely quoted by those who claim to promote nice things like freedom, democracy and equality.

And the last lingering image of “tank man” from the so-called Tiananmen Square Massacre, which is nothing more than a bullshit propaganda narrative peddled by the West, bothered me. Oh, and the touchy-feely “love beats the demon” mood toward the end doesn’t resonate well with me.

Beyond these caveats, overall a pretty good short course in what is wrong with American society and the true horrifying nature of American capitalist imperialism.

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2 Responses to Let Your Life Be a Friction to Stop the Machine

  1. beetleypete says:

    Lots of good points but no real alternative offered. I am left wondering what it asks of us, if there is no call for a different system in order to change things.
    Best wishes, Pete.

    • Prole Center says:

      Yeah, you’re right. It seems to imply that once enough people figure out the truth, then the system will just fall apart largely on its own; that the light of truth will burn away the darkness and everyone will suddenly start being nice to each other.

      I do especially like how it shatters the American mythology of exceptionalism and the demi-god status of the “founding fathers”.

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