How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right

181216-weil-youtube-tease_qdzjrq

As Georgi Dimitrov wrote in The Fascist Offensive over 80 years ago, fascism is not a petty bourgeois or lumpenproletarian uprising, but rather a creation of the big bourgeoisie in order to crush a genuine progressive populist revolution. Fascism is capitalism in crisis where the most reactionary elements of the ruling class ruthlessly defend the capitalist system. – PC

Former extremists say they were sucked in by propaganda as teenagers, thanks to an algorithm’s dark side.

For David Sherratt, like so many teenagers, far-right radicalization began with video game tutorials on YouTube. He was 15 years old and loosely liberal, mostly interested in “Call of Duty” clips. Then YouTube’s recommendations led him elsewhere.

“As I kept watching, I started seeing things like the online atheist community,” Sherratt said, “which then became a gateway to the atheism community’s civil war over feminism.” Due to a large subculture of YouTube atheists who opposed feminism, “I think I fell down that rabbit hole a lot quicker,” he said.

Continued here.

This entry was posted in Class War Chronicle and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to How YouTube Built a Radicalization Machine for the Far-Right

  1. beetleypete says:

    I was around also 15 when I became interested in extremist politics, though in my case, Left-Wing extremism. There was no Internet, no mobile phones, and little coverage on TV or in newspapers. I had to read books, form opinions based on discussions with older people, and join groups or political parties that stated the same ideas and plans. Just using available resources, I became a hard-line Stalinist within a few short years, going on to infiltrate mainstream political parties with a view to disrupting their local member-base, and trying to introduce a more radical left-wing agenda into those organisations. I also became a trade union organiser, attempting to motivate workers into some form of revolutionary thinking.
    If we had access to something like You Tube back then, Britain might well have looked very different today. The Internet is an overwhelmingly powerful tool, and possibly the most dangerous invention mankind ever came up with.
    Best wishes, Pete.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s